Author Archive

  • Bahia Grass

    Bahia Grass Bahia grass originated in Brazil, but moved to the United States in 1914. Since then, it first became a popular grass for beef production in pastures, but has also risen in popularity as a southern turf grass in lawns throughout the south east. It is a great all-purpose grass if you are looking for sod for a Florida landscape, as it is aggressive, and is easily planted from grass seed, although it must ...

    Posted at June 10, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sod Types | Comments Off on Bahia Grass
  • Posted at May 16, 2013 | By : | Categories : Business Partners | Comments Off on Some of Our Business Partners
  • Posted at May 16, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sod Types | Comments Off on Sod Type2
  • St. Augustine Grass

    St. Augustine Grass St. Augustine Grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) (also known as Charleston Grass in South Carolina) is a warm season lawn grass that is popular for use in tropical and subtropical regions. It is a medium to high maintenance grass that forms a thick, carpetlike lawn, crowding out most weeds and other grasses. Characteristics St. Augustine is a dark green grass with broad, flat blades. It spreads by above ground stolons, commonly known as "runners" and forms a dense ...

    Posted at May 16, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sod Types | Comments Off on St. Augustine Grass
  • White Flies

    White Flies Description: Recently, a new pest was reported attacking ficus trees and hedges in Florida There is a new pest attacking ficus trees and hedges in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida. This pest was identified as the fig (ficus) whitefly, Singhiella simplex, and is a new US continental record. White flies are small, winged insects that belong to the ...

    Posted at May 2, 2013 | By : | Categories : Insects | Comments Off on White Flies
  • Japanese Beetles

    Japanese Beetles Description: The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman, is a widespread and destructive pest of turf, landscape, and ornamental plants in the United States. It is also a pest of several fruit, garden, and field crops, and has a total host range of more than 300 plant species. Adult Japanese beetles feed on foliage, flowers, and fruits. Leaves are typically skeletonized or left with only tough network of veins.

    Posted at May 2, 2013 | By : | Categories : Insects | Comments Off on Japanese Beetles
  • Chinch Bugs

    Chinch Bugs Description: Chinch bugs are a complex of three different species within the Lygaeidae family. They have piercing-sucking mouthparts and they feed on the sap of grass plants. They reside in the thatch area of the turfgrass stand and prefer to feed on the lower leaf sheath and crown area of the plant. The chinch bug can be a major insect pest on home lawns throughout the country. The hairy chinch bug (Blissus hirtus) ...

    Posted at May 2, 2013 | By : | Categories : Insects | Comments Off on Chinch Bugs
  • Grub Worms

    Grub Worms Description: White grubs are the larval stage of many different beetles White grubs may be the most damaging turf insect pests in the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Japanese beetle grubs alone cause an estimated $234 million in damage each year $78 million for control costs and an additional $156 million for replacement of damaged turf.

    Posted at May 2, 2013 | By : | Categories : Insects | Comments Off on Grub Worms
  • Aphids

    Aphids Description: Aphids are small, soft-bodied insects with long, slender mouthparts with which they pierce stems, leaves, and other tender plant parts to suck out plant fluids. Almost every plant has one or more aphid species which occasionally feed on it. Many aphid species are difficult to distinguish from one another; however, identification to species is not necessary to control aphids in most situations

    Posted at May 2, 2013 | By : | Categories : Insects | Comments Off on Aphids
  • Sod Webworms

    Sod Webworms  Description: The adults are buff-colored moths which are 12 to 19 mm (1/2 to 3/4 inch) long. They sometimes have a small, dark line on the top of each wing cover. Two small finger-like projections are visible at the front of the head and look like a snout (hence, the name "snout moth"). When the moth is at rest, the wings wrap around the body, giving it a tubular shape. Adults will fly ...

    Posted at February 13, 2013 | By : | Categories : Insects | Comments Off on Sod Webworms
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